Students completing the Interdisciplinary Career Oriented Humanities Major program must demonstrate the knowledge, competencies and skills expected to have been attained during matriculation in the program, including the values, ideas, ideals and cultures of human beings in order to better realize the inter-relatedness of human knowledge and activity. This knowledge will be demonstrated by a mandatory departmental comprehensive examination and the student’s Senior Thesis. Administered by the Liberal Studies Department faculty, the departmental comprehensive examination is comprised of questions derived from courses in the core curriculum and the individual student’s chosen area of concentration. The examination format may consist of multiple choice questions, critical essays, and problem-solving exercises. The minimum competency for the exam is 70% (equivalent to a grade of “C”) and success of the exam is based upon the number of students passing the examination in the first or second attempt. The Senior Thesis will be written by the student in conjunction with a First and Second Reader, which may or may not also include the student’s advisor. Prior to the submission of the final draft of the student’s Senior Thesis, both readers will have to approve the academic quality and standards of the final draft. The graduating student will also be required to publicly present the findings of their Senior Thesis research and writing to the College community. The comprehensive examination data and the quality of the Senior Theses will be used to assess the overall effectiveness of the program and are indicators of knowledge retention and integration by students.

The student majoring in Humanities will complete four interdisciplinary courses: HUM 211, 212, 311 and 312 and fifteen semester hours beyond the general education level in one humanistic discipline such as Art, English, Music, African American Studies, Speech, History or Philosophy and Religion.

This latter discipline will be called the student’s primary discipline. The student will also complete three semester hours in the performing arts, plastic and visual arts, or creative writing.

A very important part of the students’ program is their career electives. In keeping with a carefully developed career plan, students will elect a variety of relevant career related courses from throughout the College curriculum. Students are also encouraged to elect career internships and cooperative education.

Either semester of Arts and Ideas, HUM 211 or 212, or HUM 311, may be taken separately to satisfy the Humanities requirement in General Education.

Philosophy and Religion

Philosophy and Religion is a service area and does not offer a major. Students may elect Philosophy and Religion as their emphasis under the Liberal Studies major. The courses in Philosophy and Religion aim to provide the students with an understanding of the place of philosophical and religious thought in liberal learning. These courses also aim to provide them with the tools needed for logical and effective thinking, and experience in working with fundamental human values. They should then be able to make more meaningful judgments about those values essential to both personal and community welfare.

Special Requirements:
Any course in the area, with the exception of PHI 103: Logic and Effective Thinking or PHI/SOC 316: Ethics and Values in an Aging Society, may be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement in general education.

Major in Liberal Studies: Suggested Course Sequence

    Class # Class Name Credit Hours    
   
Sophomore
     
     
    HUM 211
Arts and Ideas I
3
   
     
    HUM 212
Arts and Ideas II
3
   
     
     
Courses in Primary Discipline
6
   
     
     
   
Junior
     
     
    HUM 311
Seminar in the Humanities
3
   
     
     
Courses in Primary Discipline
6
   
     
     
Electives (Career Electives)
6
   
     
     
Creative Arts Course
3
   
     
     
   
Senior
     
     
    HUM 312
Independent Study
3
   
     
    HUM 411
Internship
3
   
     
     
Courses in Primary Discipline
3
   
     
   
Electives (Career Electives)
6
 

Religious Studies Program: Proposed Curriculum Plan

Non-traditional students may earn an Associate of Arts Degree in Religious Studies.

    Class #
Class Name
Credit Hours    
     
   
First Semester Courses
     
     
    ENG 101
Effective Writing
3
   
     
    REA 101
Reading (if required)
3
   
     
    MI 103
Mission Involvement
3
   
     
    RLS 221
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
3
   
     
    RLS 231
Religions of the World
3
   
     
   
Second Semester Courses
     
     
    ENG 102
Effective Writing
3
   
     
    PHE 104
Comprehensive Health
3
   
     
    CSC 107
Computer Literacy
3
   
     
    RLS 222
New Testament and Early Christianity
3
   
     
    RLS 232
Introduction to Christian Thought
3
   
     
   
Third Semester Course
     
     
    ART 101
Art Appreciation
3
   
     
    SPE 101
Effective Speaking
3
   
     
    HIS 131
World History
3
   
     
    PHI 304
Black Religion
3
   
     
    RLS 341
Religious Communities and Social Action
3
   
     
    RLS 343
Faith, Creativity, and the Arts
3
   
     
   
Fourth Semester Course
     
     
    PHI 101
Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
3
   
     
    MAT 102
College Algebra I
3
   
     
    HUM 311
Seminar in Humanities
3
   
     
    RLS 348
Comparative Religious Ethics
3
   
     
    RLS 350
Revealing Religion in America Today
3
   
     
   
63 Credit Hours