Humanities Courses (HUM)

HUM 211: Arts and Ideas I

An historical and thematic survey of some of the major areas of Human Civilization through an examination of literature, history, music, philosophy, religion, art and other manifestations of culture. Some attention will be given to African and Eastern cultures. Course may be used to satisfy the Humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites: English 102 or Instructor's approval

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

HUM 212: Arts and Ideas II

An historical and thematic survey of some of the major areas of Human Civilization through an examination of literature, history, music, philosophy, religion, art and other manifestations of culture. Some attention will be given to African and Eastern cultures. Course may be used to satisfy the Humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or Instructor's approval

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

HUM 247: Ethics, Medicine, and Technology

A study of the development of ethical values and reasoning in modern society and an examination from a historical perspective of how these values have been affected by major medical, scientific, and technological advances. Offered once a year. Also, listed as NSD 247 and SSD 247.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 103

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

HUM 311: Seminar in the Humanities

An interdisciplinary exploration of selected contemporary ethical issues. Works and scholars from several disciplines and community resource persons will be used. Topics may change as the concerns of the society change.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 103

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

HUM 312: Independent Study in the Humanities

The ICOHM major will conduct an individually designed program of reading and research on an approved topic. A research paper of substantial length will be produced. Required of all ICOHM majors.
Prerequisites: HUM 311 or passing grade on English Proficiency Examination

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

HUM 411: Career Internship

The student may elect to complete a twelve week period of at least ten hours per week in an employing organization. Prior to registering for the course the student, the college sponsor, and the supervisor in the host organization agree upon the goals and nature of the experience. Students keep a daily log and attend regularly scheduled sessions to explore ethical issues and the relationship of their work experiences to their academic experiences. The course is open to any junior or senior in the interdisciplinary humanities program or in any humanistic discipline upon presentation of evidence of having obtained a college sponsor and developed a goal statement. The course may be repeated once for credit provided the student does not present credit for Cooperative Education toward the degree.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

Philosophy Courses (PHI)

PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy

An historical and thematic survey of some of the major areas of Human Civilization through an examination of literature, history, music, philosophy, religion, art and other manifestations of culture. Some attention will be given to African and Eastern cultures. Course may be used to satisfy the Humanities general education requirement.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 103: Logic and Effective Thinking

The development of sound and valid reasoning. Includes inductive and deductive reasoning, propaganda analysis, argument analysis and evaluation, detection of fallacies and psychological factors that affect the thinking process. Offered each semester.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 202: Ethics

The issues and principles underlying problems of choice and value judgments will be studied. Emphasis will be on applying critical thinking to ethical decisions. Offered every third semester.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 301: Introduction to Christian Thought

A study of selected Christian concepts. Topics include but are not limited to Christology, formation of the Bible, man, nature and purpose of the Church. Offered every third semester.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or Instructor's approval

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 302: Philosophy of Religion

A philosophical investigation of some of the main concepts of religion such as salvation, God, faith, and morality. Also examines ritual, practices, and the justification for holding religious beliefs. Includes readings from representative philosophers and theologians. Offered every third semester.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or Instructor's approval

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 303: Topics in Philosophical Thought    

Allows the students to investigate areas of the discipline not covered in other course offerings, such as Philosophy of Black Americans, and Introduction to the Bible.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or Instructor's approval

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 304: Black Religion

The course will deal with the African-American religious experience as a continuum. Historical events have influenced Black Religion and have provided a diverse African-American philosophical/ religious world view. Students will examine this world view by reviewing the religious underpinning of selected sects, cults and traditional church denominations in the African American community. Offered every third semester.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or Instructor's approval

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

PHI 316: Values and Ethics in an Aging Society

A one credit hour course designed to sensitize students to the prevailing set of values and assumptions surrounding the aged in our society and to enable them to reflect on personal feelings and attitudes with regard to aging and the aged in order to enhance more effective communication with the elderly.
(Also listed as SOC 316).

Credit: 1 Semester Hour

Religious Studies Courses (RLS)

RLS 221: Old Testament/Hebrew Bible

A survey course that includes study of the contents and theology of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible), set in the context of its historical, geographical, and cultural locations. Critical literary problems are addressed and particular attention is paid to the ancient biblical worldview of racial and ethnic diversity.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 222: New Testament and Early Christianity

A survey of the New Testament materials in their historical, geographical, and historical context. Consideration will be given to some of the literary problems, the life and thought of significant New Testament figures, and early Christian belief, practice and theology. Special focus will be given to the theme of liberation as a decisive motif in the New Testament writers.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 231: Religions of the World

An introductory course that surveys the major religious traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Consideration will also be given to the diverse religious traditions of Africa and the African Diaspora.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 232: History of Christian Thought

A survey course tracing the development of the Christian tradition from its inception in the New Testament period to the present with an emphasis on significant figures, movements, and theological developments. Reflection will also be given on re-interpreting the traditional doctrines of the Christian church from the standpoint of African American faith and freedom.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 341: Religious Communities and Social Action

This course will examine some of the ways in which religious communities can effectively tackle fundamental social problems through community-based programs and outreach that government and philanthropic agencies are unable to do.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 343: Faith, Creativity, and the Arts

This course will be an exploration of what happens when religion and artistic expression intersect, i.e., when faith risks art. Questions central to this course will include: What are the fruitful comparisons between improvisation and divine creativity? How do art and the role of imagination challenge our conventional understandings of meaning and revelation? Special attention will be given to the African American experience of creativity and music as a means of engaging the Divine. Artistic expression is welcomed but not required as part of the student’s assigned work.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 348: Comparative Religious Ethics

This course will be a theological engagement of the practice of non-violence as an example of comparative religious ethics. Special attention will be given to the comparative religious ethics of Martin Luther King, Jr. and his vision of prophetic non-violence.

Credit: 3 Semester Hour

RLS 350: Revealing Religion in America Today

A capstone course that examines the methods and theories of religious studies as well as how religion is understood and practiced in contemporary America. Attention will also be given to the relationship between religion, race, and social power.

Credit: 3 Semester Hours