Mary P. Davis, M.A.
Associate Professor of French
   601-977-7886
   mpdavis@tougaloo.edu
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M.A. English, University of South Alabama
M. A. French, University of Mississippi
B. A. University of South Alabama

Professor Mary P. Davis is an Associate Professor of French and has been a member of the Tougaloo Family since 1988.  She has a Master’s Degree in English from the University of Alabama and a Master’s Degree in French from the University of Mississippi. Professor Davis has been the Coordinator of the Modern Languages Unit, Director of the Language Center, and teaches Elementary, Intermediate and Special Topics in French plus teaching course in English literature and writing. Her first passion is traveling and the study of peoples and their cultures. Her second passion is her students, many of whom have traveled to France, Mexico and several states with her.
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W. Miranda Freeman
Dean of Humanities/Associate Professor of English
   601-977-4483
   mfreeman@tougaloo.edu
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Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
M.A., Jackson State University
B.A., Tougaloo College

W. Miranda Freeman, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of English at Tougaloo College where she also serves as Dean of the Division of Humanities. In addition to her study of the Black Arts era, Dr. Freeman’s other research interest include post-colonialism and Afro-Atlantic women’s literature. She has enhanced this interest through travel to and research in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Salvador, Bahia Brazil and Accra, Ghana. Dr. Freeman is a Mellon Faculty Doctoral Fellowship recipient, a William Winter Scholar, and the 2012 Humanities Teacher of the Year. Most recently, Dr. Freeman taught a course in Caribbean Literature in Jamaica for the University of Southern Mississippi’s Study Abroad Program.
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Kedra James, Ph.D.
Interim Department Chair/Assistant Professor of English
   601-977-7918
   kjames@tougaloo.edu
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Ph.D., University of Alabama
M.A.,  Kansas State University
B.A.,  Tougaloo College

Dr. Kedra L. James began teaching in the Tougaloo Department of English and Modern Languages in August of 2016. Her research interests include basic and developmental writing, technology and writing, and African American English and the African American rhetorical tradition. She has presented her research at regional and national conferences in her field, such as the Thomas R. Watson Conference, Rhetoric Society of America (RSA) Conference, College Language Association (CLA) Conference, and the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC). She also presented her research on first-year writing programs at Historically Black Colleges and Universities at the Writing Research across Borders Conference in Paris, France. At Tougaloo, she serves as a UNCF/Mellon Mentor and the faculty advisor for the Sigma Tau Delta International English Honor Society.  She was recognized as a HEADWAE faculty honoree (2018) and received a Dr. Ernestine Holloway Excellence in Education Award (2019) and a Mississippi Humanities Council Teacher Award (2020).[/collapse]

 
Arna Shines
Instructor of English
   601-977-7752
   ashines@tougaloo.edu
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M.F.A., Full Sail University
B.A., Tougaloo College

Professor Shines is committed to the success of each of her students. She believes in their potential and strives to ensure that their English 100 experience embodies a standard of excellence that is academically challenging and life altering.
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J.D. Hosemann
Assistant Professor of English
   (601)977-5278
   jhosemann@tougaloo.edu
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M.A., The University of Southern Mississippi
B.A., The University of Southern Mississippi  

J.D. Hosemann is a writer and teacher whose stories have appeared in The Kenyon Review Online, New World Writing, and The Hong Kong Review. He’s interested in how the elements of imaginative storytelling—character, yearning, symbolism, morality—act as psychic proxies for grappling with our inner lives. As a teacher, Hosemann seeks to promote his students’ instincts to find clarity and style in language. He holds a Master’s Degree in literary criticism from The University of Southern Mississippi and taught high school English in New Orleans, Louisiana for seven years.
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Jason M. Smith
Mellon Partners for Humanities Education Postdoctoral Fellow
   (601) 977-7893
   jmsmith5@tougaloo.edu
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Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
M.A., Vanderbilt University
M.T.S., Vanderbilt University
B.A., University of Georgia

Dr. Smith’s research focuses on Christian systematic theology with a particular interest in sacramental theology, political theology, and the relationship between religion and sports. His first book, currently under review, is entitled “Eucharist as the Gift of Political Language” and examines the relationship between the political commitments that the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist imposes upon the Church. His work has also been published in Theology, Religions, Anglican Theological Review, The Heythrop Journal, and the Journal of the Philosophy of Sport. He has two children and an unhealthy love for the Georgia Bulldogs.
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Tom Lewis
Assistant Professor of English
   (601)977-5278
   tlewis@tougaloo.edu
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Ph.D., Tulane University
M.A., Ball State University
B.A., Campbellsville University

Thomas D. Lewis, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of English at Tougaloo College. Dr. Lewis is committed to engaging the tools of academia in the pursuit of linguistic and social justice. His research and teaching focuses on exploring the roles of linguistic ideologies, or beliefs about language, in shaping language use in minoritized communities in the United States. Most recently, he has worked with the Latinx community in Post-Katrina New Orleans, showing that both large scale language choice and small scale vowel realizations are shaped by linguistic ideologies that position Spanish speakers as "dangerous" or "threatening."  Dr. Lewis' research shows that beliefs about languages, dialects, and accents represent beliefs about speakers, and are often used as tools to reflect and reproduce unequal power hierarchies in society. Challenging these ideologies contributes to the pursuit of justice for speakers of marginalized linguistic codes.
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Deann Armstrong Trakas, Ph.D.
Mellon Partners in Humanities Education Postdoctoral Fellow, 2019-'21
   (601)977-5278
   darmstrong2@tougaloo.edu
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Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
M.A., King's College London
B.A., Southwestern University

Dr. Trakas has taught English courses for over a decade in many learning environments. Her moonshot goal is for her students to write papers that they actually want to write. To that effect, her teaching invites students to bring their current questions and their creativity to the study of canonical literature. Presently, she is involved in two larger projects with undergraduates and trans-institutional faculty: creating a digital archive of Shakespeare in AAVE (African American Vernacular English) and planning a week-long festival of visiting artists and scholars to lead workshops on the theme of “Textual Healing: the Humanities, Intergenerational Trauma, and Self-Care.”

Her research specialization is Early Modern English Literature (especially Shakespeare, Milton, and Donne). Her current book project practices what she preaches to her students by bringing to the study of these old, dead, white authors critical questions about time from queer theory and especially queer-of-color writing. One chapter on the erotics of time in the fantastic, gender-bending 1611 play The Roaring Girl has recently been published as an article in the scholarly journal Modern Philology. In the process of researching, she has been awarded fellowships at University College, Oxford; the Newberry Library in Chicago; the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.; and the Huntington Library in San Marino, CA. Ask her anytime about the many places she's lived, what she's cooking, or what she's watching on Hulu or HBO after her kids go to sleep.
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